It is impossible to describe the experience of our world
challenge expedition to Morocco. I expected it to have a
profound impact on my pupils but I was not expecting the
trip to have such an effect on me. Walking through the
Atlas mountains with a Moroccan guide, watching
shooting stars, meeting local people of all ages in their
Berber villages, watching the landscape open up as we
climbed higher as well as washing in small streams, were
among some of the highlights. After 5 days in the
mountains we then had to sand and paint a local
orphanage. We met many of the orphans. Watching our
pupils integrate with local children is a memory I will
cherish forever. No one wanted to go home. Visiting
Africa highlights how lucky we are in the Western world.
We had two groups of 13 pupils and 4 staff members
travelling to Morocco last July and it was an absolute
pleasure to take such wonderful, hardworking,
determined young people, I am truly proud of all the
individuals that raised the money to go. I am confident it
will be a lifelong positive, rewarding and extraordinary
experience and I look forward to running another World
Challenge Expedition in 2014.
Miss V McCarthy
Morocco was one of the most rewarding experiences I
have ever had or am ever likely to have. I wasn’t just
going to another continent and being able to make a
difference. It was the fact that I was able to make a
difference with some of my close friends and being able to
share that once in a lifetime opportunity with them. This
wouldn’t have been possible if it weren’t for our Team
Leaders, who gave up their own time to accompany us to
this amazing place.
The trek took more than just physical strength. It took the
mental strength to push yourself to the extreme and also
the patience and the leadership skills to help the rest of
your team throughout. Being able to see the
extraordinary views from the Atlas Mountains was just
incredible. They say a picture is worth 1000 words, but
the sights we witnessed could not be described.
Being able to do the project made me realise what I had
and how I take so many small things for granted. Even
having teddy bears when we were children is
something. Our project was to renovate part of the
building at the orphanage. We had to sand down and
paint the metal gate and to paint the wall that surrounded
the building. One of the hardest parts of the project was
to deal with the heat and to achieve a good standard of
work. With breaks in the shade and plenty of water we
managed it. One of the most rewarding parts of the
project was going back on one of the evenings and seeing
the children’s faces light up when we gave them the toys
we brought for them. One of the other highlights was
getting to play football with the older boys and learn more
about their culture. It did test my emotions because
before you get there you think you will be able to deal
with the whole situation, but when you actually get there
it really does pull on your heart strings.
Coming home really was hard. After being away for two
weeks, and doing all of these amazing things, I just didn’t
want the whole experience to end. Adjusting back to
normal life’ was also strange. Although eating foreign
food and being in a different culture was a struggle, it was
just the most eye
opening experience
of my life.
By
Georgie
Towersey-Veal